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The history of Ikat began in the 12th century when artists migrated to Odisha from the Patan area of what is now Gujarat. Ikat involves creating the resist by tightly wrapping individual yarns or even bundles of yarns in the preferred design before dying them. Before the fabric is weaved, the threads create the designs on an Ikat saree which are stained and bonded. The textiles used to make these iconic sarees include the elaborate geometric patterns located in "Paagadu Bandhu" (Ikat).

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Rs. 4,103.00 Rs. 6,125.00

All ethnic fashion enthusiasts appreciate the alluring Ikkat saree, a staple in modern women's collections, receiving a special mention in traditional handicrafts. The word Ikkat makes you picture the iconic diamond-like shaped patterns, curled cascades, and sometimes mandala themes. It is unfathomable that printed patterns on fabric appear to be a complex manual weaving technique that only produces such results when applied with precisely coloured threads. That develops an exclusive pattern on the fabric, the signature pattern of the fabric worn with great panache. Even today, with the various modern technologies and stylised methods of tie-dye textile art, none can bring a similar effect but Ikkat alone.

In the Telangana village of Bhoodan Pochampally, the tradition of crafting Pochampally sarees, also known as Pochampally Ikkat, started in the 1950s. At that time, in a town named Chirala, the craft was known as "Chit-Ku," which brought the ancient Pochampally Ikkat weaving style to the masses. The word "Ikkat'' stems from the Malay-Indonesian phrase "Mengikat," which means to tie together a bundle of threads. As a result of the distinctiveness of the cloth created, the weaving method was quickly taught and passed down through several generations of weavers. Due to rising demand, these Ikkat sarees soon displayed silk Ikats made of Bangalore-sourced silk, Odisha-produced cotton, and Surat-sourced zari. Most sarees have fascinating geometric designs embroidered by skilled artists using the iconic Ikkat dyeing technique.

Rs. 2,754.00 Rs. 3,240.00

Katki, also known as ‘Khandua’ and ‘Maniabandi’, is traditionally woven on wooden looms in red, orange, or yellow. The Shorea robusta(sal tree) is usually used to create the crimson hue. The Sambalpuri Ikat weave, or Katki, is a variation that has its origins in Cuttack, Odisha. Katki cotton's key selling point is that it is manufactured from pure cotton or the finest handmade silk yarn. It then goes through a lengthy, intricate procedure that takes numerous days to weave a saree. Hence its beauty is exquisite.

The decorations on the Katki saree incorporate several stories articulated according to the Buddhist mythological characters, such as Buddha in the form of an elephant in the presence of a trailing vine with peacocks in it. The caricatures even depict flowers, and Deula Kumbha named Nabagunjara, a lesser-known Orissan animal. Unique features of Katki sarees are the unadorned and exclusive temple patterned borders. Lord Jagannath remains one of the key inspirations of Katki cotton, the most esteemed deity in Odisha. The inspirations are seen on the temple borders along with mythological designs made from the similar traditional colours of Jagannath.

The Katki sarees have become well-known in part because of their exceptional craftsmanship. It is undeniable that sarees produced on power looms are unable to achieve such a pristine and unsullied finish. The Katki saree is adored by people worldwide if we keep up with the changing times. Everyone from celebrities to Odissi dancers has been pictured wearing this elegant clothing on various occasions. With some fairly frequent themes like a star, lotus, conch, rudraksha, chakra, fish, swan, elephant, peacock, parrot, temple, deer, lion, horse, etc., one can also observe the greater variance in its borders and Pallava style. Katki cotton is arguably the best wear opted for any festive or celebration occasion.

Rs. 5,270.00

If you are looking for the perfect evergreen saree, feel the new Yellow Green Cotton Ikkat Pallu Saree. The texture of the cloth is beautiful and soft. Cotton is always soft to the skin and the pleats fall perfectly in place. The saree is a mixture of bottle green, spring and yellow color. The vibrance of the yellow color will reflect the beautiful mind of women and the green color will always make you feel evergreen. The knots are perfectly done in triangle shape and the floral prints will give a rich effect of the garden. This new type of hand made and hand block prints is found on ReshamSuti only for you.

All ethnic fashion enthusiasts appreciate the alluring Ikkat saree, a staple in modern women's collections, receiving a special mention in traditional handicrafts. The word Ikkat makes you picture the iconic diamond-like shaped patterns, curled cascades, and sometimes mandala themes. It is unfathomable that printed patterns on fabric appear to be a complex manual weaving technique that only produces such results when applied with precisely coloured threads. That develops an exclusive pattern on the fabric, the signature pattern of the fabric worn with great panache. Even today, with the various modern technologies and stylised methods of tie-dye textile art, none can bring a similar effect but Ikkat alone.

In the Telangana village of Bhoodan Pochampally, the tradition of crafting Pochampally sarees, also known as Pochampally Ikkat, started in the 1950s. At that time, in a town named Chirala, the craft was known as "Chit-Ku," which brought the ancient Pochampally Ikkat weaving style to the masses. The word "Ikkat'' stems from the Malay-Indonesian phrase "Mengikat," which means to tie together a bundle of threads. As a result of the distinctiveness of the cloth created, the weaving method was quickly taught and passed down through several generations of weavers. Due to rising demand, these Ikkat sarees soon displayed silk Ikats made of Bangalore-sourced silk, Odisha-produced cotton, and Surat-sourced zari. Most sarees have fascinating geometric designs embroidered by skilled artists using the iconic Ikkat dyeing technique
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